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Parklands rules and regulations

Like all of the world's great parks, Centennial Parklands has rules and regulations to ensure the safety and enjoyment of all visitors.

The rules also help us to protect the plants and animals that make their homes in the Parklands.

Park rangers enforce the rules under NSW State law. If you ignore or break them, you could be fined.

Please note:

The following is only a select summary of the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2014. For a comprehensive list of regulations in Centennial Parklands please ensure you refer to the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2014.

Visitor Behaviour

In the interests of ensuring the Parklands are a place for the whole community, a person must not do any of the following in Centennial Parklands:

  • use indecent, obscene, insulting or threatening language

  • behave in an offensive or indecent manner

  • cause serious alarm or affront to a person by disorderly or unsafe conduct

  • obstruct a person in the performance of that person’s work or duties

  • fail to comply with a reasonable request or direction given for the purpose of securing good order, security and safety and management and enjoyment of the Trust lands by a member of the Trust, the Director or an authorised person.

Anyone who does any of the following must leave the Parklands if requested to do so by the Trust, the Director and Chief Executive or an authorised person.

Noise and disturbance

A person must not in Centennial Parklands, except with the written permission of, and in the manner approved by, the Trust, the Director and Chief Executive or an authorised person:

  • operate a radio, cassette player, record player, compact disc player or other similar device, or play a musical instrument, at a volume likely to cause nuisance or inconvenience to a person, or

  • operate a public address system or similar device, or

  • sound, or cause, or allow to be sounded, a motor vehicle intruder alarm or sounding device continuously or intermittently for more than 90 seconds after the device or alarm has first sounded.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

Access hours for vehicles and horses to Centennial Park are sunrise to sunset daily - these may vary with seasonal changes in time (ie. daylight savings). Please see our Gate Opening Times webpage for more detailed information.

Please note the following:

  • Pedestrians can enter Centennial Parklands 24 hours a day.

  • Moore Park Golf course is accessible by the public, however for personal safety pedestrians should remain on formal paths and strictly no dogs are permitted on any part of the course.

  • Pedestrians cannot cross any section of the Busway unless at a designated pedestrian crossing.

  • The Trust, the Director and Chief Executive, or an authorised person may close to the public any part of the Trust lands or any building within the Trust lands by the use of a sign or signs displayed on or adjacent to the part or building. A person must not enter (whether on foot or by vehicle) any part of the Trust lands, or any building within the Trust lands, that is fenced off, or locked, or closed to the public by a sign or signs displayed under this clause, except with the written permission of, and in the manner approved by, the Trust or the Director and Chief Executive.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

The Trust may regulate the parking of vehicles on any part of Centennial Parklands by a sign or signs displayed on or adjacent to the part.

All park visitors must not park a vehicle on a part of Centennial Parklands in contravention of a sign displayed.

No vehicle may be left parked in Centennial Parklands after sunset and before sunrise except with the written permission of the Trust. The Trust is entitled to charge a fee determined by it for the opening of a gate after sunset and before sunrise to permit the removal of a vehicle from the Trust lands.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

Vehicle restrictions in Centennial Park

Centennial Parklands offer unlimited picnic spots and free BBQ sites in Centennial Park, Moore Park and Queens Park. These operate on a first-in basis and cannot be reserved without permission of the Trust.

There are a number of picnic sites that can be reserved. Find out more by visiting our Picnics bookings page.

Visitors can bring in portable BBQs with legs (except during periods of total fire ban), as well as portable picnic equipment such as tables and chairs. Portable BBQs that sit on the grass are strictly prohibited, as is the dumping hot coals, oil, hot or frozen liquid are prohibited.

Lighting fires and discharging fireworks are also prohibited.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

While alcohol consumption is permitted within most of Centennial Parklands, the Trust may declare any part of the Parklands or any building within the Parklands to be an alcohol-free zone by the use of a sign or signs displayed on or adjacent to the part or building.

Park visitors must not consume any alcohol in any such alcohol-free zone, except with the written permission of the Trust.

Park visitors must place all empty bottles in the appropriate bins provided in the Parklands or take them out of the Parklands with them.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

A 3.8 kilometre cycling and rollerblading track follows the perimeter of Grand Drive, Centennial Park.

Please note the following:

  • Cyclists must observe the 30 km per hour speed limit, wear helmets and follow one-way traffic directions.

  • Cyclists are not permitted to ride in packs of more than 16 and closer than 3 metres.

  • Bicycle racing is prohibited, unless specifically approved by the Trust.

  • Adult cyclists and rollerbladers are not allowed on the Learner’s Cycleway.

  • All cyclists must wear a safety-approved helmet at all times.

  • Rollerbladers are not permitted on the Grand Drive footpath in Centennial Park.

  • Three-wheel pedal cars are not allowed in Centennial Park. Four-wheel pedal cars are permitted. Pedal cars are prohibited in the Parklands except on Grand Drive cycle path.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

Dogs must be on a lead inside and on the Grand Drive circuit, and within 10 metres of Federation Pavilion. You may exercise your dog off-leash outside Grand Drive, but you must keep it under control at all times.

In addition, please note the following:

  • Dogs are not allowed on the horse or cycle tracks, roads, equestrian grounds, children’s playgrounds, Learner’s Cycleway, in ponds or on sporting fields when in use.

  • Dogs must be kept 10 metres away from BBQs and children’s playgrounds.

  • Dogs must not be led by cyclists, rollerbladers, horse riders or from vehicles.

  • Dog owners must clean up their dog’s droppings and dispose in proper bins.

  • A single person can lead a maximum of four dogs.  

  • Greyhounds must be muzzled.

  • Restricted breeds such as pit bull terriers and Argentinian fighting dogs must be on a leash, muzzled and under the control of a person over 18 years at all times.

You can download our Dogs in Centennial Parklands brochure or pick it up at brochure racks across the Parklands.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

Playing fields are available for team sports, including cricket, soccer, hockey, rugby and touch football.

However, please note the following:

  • You can bring volleyball nets (weighted not pegged) and kites into the Parklands.

  • Cricket, football and other organised games are not permitted in the area around the Rose Garden and flower beds.

  • Starting pistols, archery, golf (except at Moore Park Golf Course), javelin, discus, abseiling, hang gliding and boomerangs are strictly prohibited.

  • Swimming, wading and fishing in ponds and streams are prohibited.

  • Motorised model aircraft, boats and cars are prohibited in the Parklands.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

Centennial Park is one of the few remaining parks in the world to offer inner-city horse riding. A 3.6 kilometre horse track encircles Grand Drive. There are also about two hectares of fenced equestrian grounds.

Please note the following regarding riding in Centennial Parklands:

* Should you wish to ride a private non stabled horse in Centennial Parklands, please contact CPEC for requirements.

For the full range of Rules and Regulations regarding horse riding in Centennial Parklands, please review the Equestrian Centre Code of Conduct.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

  • Riders must stay in these designated riding areas.

  • Riders must wear a helmet. Your horse must be properly saddled and bridled.

  • Breaking-in and long reining  not permitted.

  • Leading more than one horse is not permitted.

  • Leading a dog while riding a horse is not permitted.

  • Horses are not allowed in the Parklands after dark.

  • Permit a horse to gallop or canter except in designated areas.

  • The equestrian grounds is restricted to those with a permit.

No camping or residency is permitted within Centennial Parklands without the written permission of the Trust

In addition, park visitors may not erect or occupy a building, tent, screen, awning, enclosure or other structure without written permission of the Trust.

If a person fails to comply with a direction given under this regulation, an authorised person of the Trust may remove the building, tent, screen, awning, enclosure or other structure.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

A person must not on the Trust lands, except with the written permission of, and in the manner approved by, the Trust or the Director and Chief Executive, do any of the following:

  • bring stock (other than horses) or poultry,

  • bring any animal (being an animal that is not prohibited from being on Trust lands) unless it is under the effective control of a competent person by means of an adequate chain, cord, leash or cage,

  • allow stock (including a horse) to graze,

  • ride a horse unless the horse is properly saddled and bridled with a bit,

  • ride a horse except on a track or other part of the Trust lands designated for the purpose by the Trust or the Director by a sign or signs displayed on or near the track or the part,

  • break-in a horse,

  • permit a horse to gallop or canter except on a part of the Trust lands designated as equestrian grounds in the part of the Trust lands known as Centennial Park and at the Centennial Parklands Equestrian Centre,

  • train a racehorse or harness racing horse,

  • lead a horse unless the horse is wearing a bit,

  • lead more than one horse at a time,

  • lunge a horse except in an area designated for the purpose by the Trust or the Director by a sign or signs displayed on or near the area,

  • drive a horse-drawn vehicle on a road or track that is situated within the area surrounded by the horse track and Grand Drive,

  • long rein a horse,

  • use the horse track for a purpose other than riding or leading a horse,

  • leave a horse unattended or untethered (except in a stable box at the Centennial Parklands Equestrian Centre),

  • lead a dog on a leash while in control of a horse or from or attached to a moving vehicle,

  • run or exercise a dog that is not on a leash from a moving vehicle.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

A person must not in Centennial Parklands, except with the written permission of, and in the manner approved by, the Trust or the Director and Chief Executive, organise or conduct a foot race, cycle race, horse race, wheelchair race, fun run, rollerblade run or similar event.

All event applicants should utilise the appropriate bookings form.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

The following Regulations are in place to protect the Parklands natural and built environment and to ensure the ongoing enjoyment of the Parklands for other park visitors and native habitat.

Park visitors must not damage any part or building or structure in Centennial Parklands, including:

  • damage a lawn, playing field or green except in the course of, and as a normal incident of, recreational or sporting activity on any part of the Trust lands designated for use for that activity

  • remove, uproot, or cause damage to, or remove a part from, a tree, shrub, plant or other vegetation

  • climb on any tree

  • remove any timber, log or stump, standing or fallen

  • deface, dig up or remove any rock, soil, sand, stone or similar substance

  • write on, paint on, climb on, damage, deface, interfere with, destroy or remove any fixture, fitting or machinery displayed or placed by the Trust

  • block or inhibit (whether wholly or partially) access through, to or on a gate, access-way, path or road

  • damage, destroy, remove, interfere with, pass through or step over any temporary or permanent fencing or any barricade or other structure regulating access to any part of the Parklands or any building within the Parklands by foot or vehicle

  • destroy, capture, injure or cause nuisance to, or attempt to destroy, capture, injure or cause nuisance to, an animal within Centennial Parklands

  • destroy or interfere with the habitat of an animal

  • abandon any animal

  • light a fire at a time when the lighting of fires on the Trust lands is prohibited by or under the provisions of the Rural Fires Act 1997, or at any other time, except in a fireplace or on equipment provided for the purpose by the Trust or in portable cooking equipment

  • empty coals or any other material from a barbecue on to any grass, lawn, playing field, green or vegetation

  • deposit or throw any article or substance into any lake, pond, stream or ornamental water.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

Park visitors must protect the Parklands by placing rubbish in the appropriate rubbish or recycling bins provided, or take away any rubbish they bring to the Parklands.

Park visitors are not permitted to bring any waste into the Parklands, deposit any oil or similar product, or any hot or frozen liquid, or allow such a product or liquid to escape, in the Parklands. This includes any discarded, rejected, unwanted, surplus or abandoned substance.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

From time to time, people whose relatives have enjoyed a strong connection with Centennial Parklands have asked if their ashes can be scattered in the Parklands after their deaths. The Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust (Trust) understands that people wish to scatter ashes in an area that may have had a special meaning to their loved one. However the Trust believes the use the Parklands as a memorial site unsuitable for a number of reasons:

  • the Trust cannot guarantee that the area in which the ashes have been scattered will remain accessible

  • that the condition of the location will remain the same or that changes to the Parklands will not impact on the chosen location (eg. a tree chosen as a landmark for scattering the ashes may be removed or garden area designs may be altered rendering the site inaccessible).

In addition, whilst the ashes from human remains do not pose a health risk, some visitors may perceive a risk to their families and pets which would impact on their use and enjoyment of the Parklands.

The Parklands also provides a social environment for a diversity of cultures - some of whom may be uncomfortable with the sight of a service, ceremony or scattering of ashes.

Family members wishing to maintain a connection with the Parklands should contact the Centennial Parklands Foundation which offers a number of ways to dedicate in memory of a loved one, and also help to conserve the Parklands for future generations. Please visit www.yourparklands.org.au for more information.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

Commercial Activity in Centennial Parklands

A person must not in Centennial Parklands, except with the written permission of, and in the manner approved by, the Trust or the Director and Chief Executive, do any of the following things or assist a person to do any of the following things:

  • collect or attempt to collect money

  • sell or attempt to sell any papers, printed matter, food, article, thing or service

  • sell or attempt to sell (or purchase or attempt to purchase) any tickets to any activity or ceremony or other event

  • conduct or cause the conduct of an amusement, event, promotion, instruction or performance, whether free of charge or for money or consideration of any kind or so as to compete with or hinder the commercial operations of any person holding a lease or licence from the Trust

  • establish or operate a business

  • organise or participate in, or cause to be organised, a public meeting, public function, public demonstration, public gathering or other public activity

  • use television, cinematographic or photographic equipment for commercial or promotional purposes

  • erect a hoarding, banner or notice, or display or distribute commercial, promotional or political advertising matter or a sign, bill, poster or other printed matter

  • erect a sign or attach a sign to a tree, pole, rail or fence.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

For the purposes of section 20A of the Act, the use of the Trust lands is authorised for the purpose of the following events or classes of events, being events or classes of events for which it is reasonably anticipated that more than 20,000 persons at one time will resort to the land:

(a)  the New Mardi Gras Parade and Party,
(b)  the class of events comprising events that are film festivals, musical events, cultural events or food and beverage events of a kind that are consistent with the objects of the Trust in relation to the Trust lands.

The Parklands must not be used for the purpose of more than 8 events of the class contemplated by subclause (1) (b) in any calendar year.

The Trust may authorise the use of Parklands for a purpose referred to in subclause (1) subject to such conditions as the Trust considers to be appropriate.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

Commercial filming and photography are prohibited without a permit.

Many well-known films have been shot in the Parklands. There are a range of locations for commercial filming and photography available at competitive rates.

For enquiries and bookings call (02) 9339 6699 or visit the Filming and Photography webpage.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

The Director and Chief Executive or an authorised person who suspects on reasonable grounds that a person in the Parklands has committed an offence against the Act or this Regulation may require the person to state his or her full name and residential address.

A person must not:
(a)  fail without reasonable excuse to comply with a requirement under this clause, or
(b)  in purported compliance with such a requirement, furnish information that the person knows to be false or misleading in a material particular.

However, a person is not guilty of an offence unless it is established that the Director or authorised person warned the person that the failure to comply with the requirement is an offence.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

The Trust may from time to time determine the fees that are payable by a person to whom the Trust or the Director and Chief Executive has given any permission to use part of the Trust lands. The Trust may require payment of such a fee by a date specified by the Trust (including a date in advance of the date of the relevant use).

Any unpaid fee may be recovered by the Trust from the person liable to pay it as a debt in a court of competent jurisdiction.

The Trust may reduce, or waive payment of, a fee payable under this clause.

The Trust may accept, or determine, consideration in kind in lieu of a fee under this clause.

Find out more about Fees and Charges in Centennial Parklands.

The above information is paraphrased from the Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009. For the full text and the Regulation in its entirety, visit the NSW Legislation website.

The Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009 prescribes a number of penalty notices for offences under the Regulation. These can be found online at:

Centennial Park and Moore Park Trust Regulation 2009

Additional restrictions

In order to protect public safety and the environmental and heritage assets of the Parklands, there are additional restrictions that should be complied with for specific activities. These are:

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