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Tree removal works in Centennial Park [Aug - Sept 2021]

A number of large trees will be removed in Centennial Park, that have been assessed by arborists as terminal, in the coming weeks to improve safety for park visitors.

There will be some impacts to the Parklands in relation to access and noise and these are detailed for each removal below:

Removal of tree from Randwick Pine Grove – Tuesday 21 September

A large Pinus pinaster will be removed from the Randwick Pine Grove, near the Randwick gates, on the advice of independent arborists.

Reason for removal: The tree is declining rapidly, with increasing deadwood production and decay is spreading from the trunk to neighbouring branches. There is now a high risk of major branch failure so the tree is being removed in the interests of public safety.

Impacts for park users: Machine noise will be heard in the area and alternate pedestrian pathways will be managed.

Tree replacement strategy - Succession planting of native trees (Syncarpia glomulifera) to replace aging Pinus pinaster started in 2015 and is ongoing. Find out more about our tree planting program here.

Removal of seven trees at Queens Park on Thursday 2 September 2021 – Monday 6 September 2021. 

Seven trees, identified by arborists as unsafe or in poor condition, will be removed from Queens Park (at Darley Road) on Thursday 2 September. 6 are coral trees (which are identified as a noxious weed) and one is a small melaleuca tree near the current playground.There will be no impacts to park access and all trees are all within fenced areas where removals will safely take place. Nearby residents and park users may experience machinery noise for the duration of the works.

The image below details where the trees will be removed and includes a tree that has already been removed.

Schedule of works:

  • Thursday 2/09 – tree removal will start from the York Road end of Darley Road
  • Friday 3/09 – continue tree removal between Café and Carrington Road
  • Monday 6/09 – finalise any remaining tree removal, mainly stump grinding works

Removal of Port Jackson figs on Wednesday 25 and Thursday 26 August 2021

Two Port Jackson fig trees in Centennial Park are now in the late stage of terminal decline and despite years of health treatment programs, both trees must be removed to protect the Park’s visitors and inhabitants.

In preparation for their removal, Greater Sydney Parklands’ horticulture experts have planted 36 new, Port Jackson figs in various locations along Grand Drive. The Parklands have anticipated the aging trees in this area, including the two failing figs, will eventually need replacing.

Over the past three years, treatments applied to the trees include supplementary carbohydrates and plant tonics, but the figs have continued to decline. Their failure has resulted in deadwood, reduced leaf coverage and they will not survive.
To protect the safety of our Parklands, the figs trees will be removed over two days, on Wednesday 25 and Thursday 26 August. During this time, the following restrictions will be in place:

Impacts for park users: Traffic control measures will be in place along the northern end of Grand Drive for the duration of the work hours – 7am to 4pm on both days. A lane will be partially closed and vehicle and cycle lanes will need to merge.
Car parking will also be unavailable between Dickens and Parkes Drive.
The horse track will also be closed between Dickens and Parkes Drive during the work hours.  
Machinery in use: Park users will expect to hear machinery noise for the duration of the works.

The image displayed below shows the location of the tree removal and traffic control:

Read more on our plans for tree replacement and new planting in our Centennial Parklands Tree Planting Program webpage.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
Over the past three years, treatments applied to the trees include supplementary carbohydrates and plant tonics, but the figs have continued to decline. Their failure has resulted in deadwood and reduced leaf coverage and the prognosis is they will not survive. They now pose a risk to the public (if part of the tree falls down) and need to be removed. The trees have been independently assessed and recommended for removal by expert arborists. 
Tree removal experts have been engaged to remove the trees and have advised it will take two days to remove them completely.
36 mature Port Jackson figs have been planted along Grand Drive, in the last three years, as part of a succession planting program to ensure the historic character and features that make Centennial Parklands unique are preserved into the future. These 200 litre Ficus rubiginosa have been sourced from specimens grown at the University of NSW, to keep the trees as locally endemic as possible. The trees were contract grown especially for Centennial Parklands. The Parklands also has another 20 more on order that will be ready for planting in 2023. In addition to the figs the Parklands have also replaced Quercus ilex (Holm Oak) and Araucaria heterophylla (Norfolk Island Pine) in keeping with the themed and sequenced Grand Drive planting.
 
The program is in place to manage the aging tree population, with the first plantings of Port Jackson figs in Centennial Parkland starting in the late 1800s.  
Centennial Parklands staff care for over 16,000 trees across Moore Park, Queens Park and Centennial Park with 181 new trees planted since January 2021. Our team spend a lot of time caring for our Parklands’ beautiful trees, to ensure they live for as long as they can. Find out more about our Tree Planting Program.  
 
The area surrounding the trees will be fenced off for safety. The footpath will be closed and there will be a spotter and signage to guide pedestrians to a path on the other side of the fence. There will be VMS signage in place advising motorists of tree work in progress and preparing them to stop and a traffic controller (with a stop-go sign) managing flow. Jervois Avenue gate will be closed and signage advising diversion in place.

Monday 16 August
Type and location of the tree: A large Corymbia maculate will be removed from the Ian Potter Children’s Wild Play Garden (which is currently closed for annual maintenance).
Impacts for park users: Machinery will be parked on Loch Avenue South and machinery noise will be heard in this location.
Machinery in use: Removal will involve a large crane set-up and other associated machinery including wood chippers, trucks and stump grinders.
Reason for tree removal: The tree is in decline, due to poor health (has tested positive for Phytophthora spp). Has been monitored over the past three years but continues to decline with reduced leaf size and coverage and dead limbs which are a potential hazard.
Tree replacement strategy: A 100L Argyrodendron trifoliatum has been selected to be planted as a replacement in the garden.

The image displayed below shows the location of the tree removal and crane positioning:

Thursday 19 August
Type and location of the tree: Removal and dismantling of a large Quercus virginiana near the Rangers Cottage on Martin Road.
Impacts for park users: Mainly dog walkers and pedestrians who will be redirected to the south west corner (signs in place) and park users will experience machinery noise in this area.
Machinery in use: Removal will involve wood chippers, trucks and stump grinders.
Reason for tree removal: The tree is in terminal decline with the main stem split.
Tree replacement strategy: Centennial Parklands is committed to delivering the Greening Sydney project with 1130 trees being planted across the Parklands.

The image displayed below shows the location of the tree removal:

Tree management

Our Centennial Parklands horticultural team are dedicated and passionate about caring for our Parklands’ beautiful trees, to ensure they live for as long as they can. Find out more about how we manage our trees and the different types here. 

If you have any concerns, please don't hestiate to contact us.